Gardening through our first summer at the farm

It's been so hot that it's hard to believe that anything is blooming right now but there are so many flowers that have been just waiting for this time of year. Of course I'm always happy to see some daylilies in August and there a few beauties right now.

Daylily 'Hidden Music'
Daylily 'Hidden Music'
Daylily 'Mississippi Blues'
Daylily 'Mississippi Blues'

While the daylilies steal the show in June and July, I really appreciate all the other beautiful flowers this time of year. The butterflies seem to be enjoying them also.

Tiger Swallowtail on Coneflowers
Tiger Swallowtail on Coneflowers

The Mountain Mint (Pycanthemum incanum) has been particularly popular.

Buckeye butterfly, Mountain mint, cut flowers, pollinators
Buckeye butterfly
Swallowtail butterfly on mountain mint
Swallowtail butterfly on mountain mint
Skipper butterfly
Skipper butterfly

The monarchs have just begun making their appearance here. The variety of milkweeds have caught their attention and we are starting to see caterpillars. The Asclepias incarnata and A. tuberosa are both native to the farm. I grew the A. curassavica from seed and it will probably not overwinter here.

Monarch on Asclepias tuberosa
Monarch on Asclepias tuberosa
Monarch on Swamp milkweed (Asclepias incarnata)
Monarch on Swamp milkweed (Asclepias incarnata)
Monarch on tropical milkweed (Asclepias curassavica)
Monarch on tropical milkweed (Asclepias curassavica)
Monarch caterpillar on swamp milkweed
Monarch caterpillar on swamp milkweed

It seems like I planted everything in a mad rush last fall so I am always happy to find a combination of plants that seems to fit well together. I really like this Rudbekia lancinata with a short pink aster in front of it.

Rudbekia lanciniata withn pink aster

And these Blackberry Lillies (Iris domestica) with native, self-sown Fleabane (Erigeron philadelphicus)

Blackberry lily

I think this combo of Chinese fountain grass (Pennisetum alopecuroides) that I started from seed, Wendy's Wish Salvia and Swamp Milkweed (Asclepias incarnata) is going to get better and better as the season goes on.

DSC_8811

I love how this transplanted native clematis is using Ninebark 'Summer Wine' as a trellis. It's well past bloom time for the clematis but I transplanted it from our lower field and it never had a chance to flower in early spring so I guess it decided it was now or never.

Clematis on Ninebark Summer wine

All in all I think the gardens have done well their first summer here. I can't wait to see what the fall blooms will look like and of course there is the constant planning for next year.

Happy Gardening!

2 thoughts on “Gardening through our first summer at the farm”

  1. Nicole, So glad Kate posted about your farm as I looked it up and love your blog. I’ve read all your posts and now I want to go to Abington, VA. My sister-in-law lives on Longview Road. So sorry about the flooded gardens…made me hurt for you. Beautiful blog.

    1. Carolyn, I’m so glad you enjoyed my posts. Thank you for your kind comments. I was just thinking that it’s been exactly a year since we visited VA and Grayson Highlands. It really is a beautiful place. I’m trying to post more regularly so I hope you’ll stop back again.

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